Tag Archive: Roadraceparts



In car video of the 2012 Road Atlanta Trans Am race. View is from John Baucom’s #86 Baucom Motorsports/Roadraceparts.com Mustang.

Enjoy.

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If you follow motorsport, this is a bittersweet time of year. Until the Daytona 24 hours there is almost no racing, and in fact precious little testing. Therefore up passes for news is generally pretty uninteresting, and obviously was a streetch on the authors part.

The exception to this is the constant flow of information about the two largest racing series in the world, F1 and Nascar. Before anybody starts to aim their digital flamethrower in my direction, let me say that I know F1 is far and away the king of motorsport. And as you look at the news articles you can see why.

But every now and then somebody does something to make you sit up and take notice. This time it was Caterham F1,one of the newer F1 teams, formerly known as Lotus F1. But lets not get sidetracked as to why they are Caterham, and the former Renault team is now Lotus. I can explain, but I wont.

As you may recall, every year all the F1 teams unveil, or launch, their new cars. And this is one of the highlights of the winter doldrums. To finally get to see your heros and the all new car which will, hopefully, win the World Championship. Its the motor racing equivalent of when we were kids getting to see the new model Chevy/Ford/Dodge. Remember those days, when the cars were brought to the dealership all covered up so nobody could see them? Well, those days are gone, but not the F1 launches.

I digress however. So why if this happens every year was I impressed by the Caterham launch? After all these things happen every year, and they have been done in every type of location from exotic to mundane. From elegant and understated to way over the top. In fact, I was beginning to believe that the only way they could come up with something different was to shoot it out of a cannon and land it in a bunch of Hooters girls.

But instead they did something so different, yet simple that you have to wonder why nobody (that I know of) had done it. They simply announced that their launch would be the first of the year, AND it would be on the cover of F1 Racing magazine. Only the most widely read F1 magazine in the world. And of course they would follow with Facebook, and other digital media.

Of course some people got their issue early and the news was broken a day early. Which I’m sure caused a lot of crocodile tears at Caterham. And now ScarbsF1 has a great analysis of the car, F1 racing had a article to go along with the photos, etc.

All of this is just a long winded way to say that in a time where we wring our hands and blame the economy for every ill in motor sport what was this worth? In the name of full disclosure I must admit that I have been impressed by this teams PR savvy ever since its inception. That said,how much uncontested FREE publicity did those guys get from just having a simple idea? If you were a potential sponsor what would you think of such out of the box thinking.

So, if you’re out there trying to get somebody to help you with your racing, and your by the numbers presentation isn’t working, maybe you need to think about a different approach.


Mustang Vintage Racer

Mustang Vintage TA Car

Aerodynamics is probably the most important aspect of the modern race car. Those of us who are F1 fans see how those teams spend untold sums of money, expend more man hours in wind tunnels and employ unimaginable computer power to gain just the slightest advantage in down force or drag reduction. Who would have imagined a couple of years ago that the engines exhaust gases could be used to increase downforce? Or that how that was executed would be the difference between a world beater and a mid pack car.

But how, if at all, does aerodynamics effect our world, where the bodywork is made from carbon fiber or fiberglass, and all made from the same molds? The answer isn’t simple, and I will freely admit that I dont know everything that is going on here.

But we do know that in the days when steel roofs were required, things were creative.  A steel roof was required to prevent the cheating up of the windshield. However a stock roof will not fit the molded bodywork. Not only was the metal stretched, but it was sectioned. In other words a pie shaped section cut out so that the stock windshield fits but the greenhouse is as small as possible.

But you say that’s just vintage cars whats that got to do with the cars we run now? True, point well taken. But remember that the laws of physics are the same for an F1 car or a GT1 car. And  its all about managing the flow of air around the vehicle and underneath the car. So I will just point some things in no particular order. And remember, in making these points I am not accusing anybody of doing anything.

First, back in the old days of the Trans-Am series they required that the body not below the line of the chassis. As part of the tech inspection a straight edge be placed across the bottom of the car. The advantage of course being that dropping the body below the frame, (which has a belly pan) you create diffuser tunnels between the door and the frame rail.

Even if the body is even with the frame rails, you can do the same thing with the filler panels between the body and frame. This requires a little creativity so as not to be conspicuous.

Speaking of the area between the door panel and the car itself, I have seen some radiused pieces placed at the front of the filler panel. The purpose was obvious, but how do you get that air out from under the car? Its blocked by the rear wheel tub, so wouldnt it be better to get it out at the front wheel opening?

A few years ago one of the major Ford teams cars cars appeared to be a little different. Just by observation it seemed that the rear undertray had more of a slope than the other Fords. Of course the part had the proper approval stickers.

The mesh on the grill opening can effect the amount of downforce on the front of the car. Of course the finer the mesh the less air can get through. And using one consistent mesh is just a matter of convenience right?

Speaking of Fords, the 93-up Mustang had a huge flat rear deck. That made these cars more responsive to body rake. By getting that deck exposed to more airflow, you increased the downforce. Almost like using a larger spoiler. Other makes may have the same issues.

Dive planes of course are useful in tuning the front end.

And the primary goal is doing anything possible to first prevent air from getting under the car, secondly to exhaust the air that does get under the front of the car. I had a steel bodied Mustang, that used a steel hood, with a scoop, that had all the reinforcement removed. Down the straightaway the rear of the hood would rise up to the full extent of the hood pins. Perhaps 6″ in the center. If we could have prevented that it could have meant some nice gains. Food for thought.

If its allowed by the rules, opening up where the rear license plate was allows a place to exhaust air from the rear. many people  use this as a place to place an oil cooler for the trans or rear.

And of course the wickerbill on the rear end can be used as a tuning tool, as well as the angle of the wing itself will increase rear downforce.

Like anything else when you change one end of the car it effects the other as well. We’ve just thrown a few things out there, and obviously just scratched the surface of what may be going on. But if you look closely there may be things that make you say “hmmm?”


John Baucom's Mustang at 3Rivers. Note the "Roadraceparts" decal on the door

John Baucom's Mustang at 3Rivers. Note the "Roadraceparts" decal on the door


By now most people with any interest in the TransAm Series have heard about the schedule for the 2011 season.  And, it seems like among other things we’re going to get what we’ve asking for. The news out of PRI, is that at long last the Trans Am races, or at least some of them are going to be on television.
Hopefully this will be a major step toward getting the series the recognition it deserves. We’ve seen the struggle with the car counts the past couple of years.  Certainly a lot of credit goes to those who have put forth a lot of effort into keeping the series going when things didn’t look so good.
Hopefully this move will encourage more people to bring their cars out and participate, even if only in selected races.  And it might even encourage some sponsors to participate as well. Neither one of those would be a bad thing.
All in all this is the best news Ive heard in a while.


We have been neglecting this blog for way too long. Of course we, like everybody else, can rationalize it by just saying we’re too busy. But its really a case of lack of discipline.
Over the next couple of months we believe you will see some exciting new developments with Roadraceparts.
Already we nave added Twitter and Facebook pages, and the designer has started redesigning the website.
But the change goes far beyond that, to the very structure and direction of the company.
To release details now will be premature, but suffice to say, Roadraceparts will be actively involved in a racing series nest year.
For now thats all we can say.
Russ Edwards