Tag Archive: Motorsports

Mosport Trans Am 2012. Footage from John Baucom’s #86 Baucom Motorsports/Roadraceparts Mustang.



In car video of the 2012 Road Atlanta Trans Am race. View is from John Baucom’s #86 Baucom Motorsports/Roadraceparts.com Mustang.


This is the in car camera video from John Baucom’s #86 Roadraceparts Mustang during qualifying for the 2013 Road Atlanta Trans Am race.

Some of us can remember when 300 Horsepower was a lot for the street, even some pretty exotic cars were fairly hard pressed to meet that number. But in case you haven’t heard time isn’t the only thing that has moved on.

My first GT1 car.

My first GT1 car.

The car in the picture was my first GT1 car. It had about 550 HP, on its best day, back in the late 80’s. Not bad for a club racer but its 351 engine was almost certainly the best thing about it. The professionals however wouldn’t have considered it.

By the time the second coming of the TransAm series ended they were running 310 cid engines with rev limiters. These engines were, at least for those at the front end of the pack, in excess of 700 horsepower.

But now things have really changed. The 310 has gone the way of the dinosaur, replaced by the 358 cubic inch V8’s. Initially a lot of these were refugees from Nascar. Bought for less than one could build a 310 and producing big horsepower numbers. Initially some people just changed the cam, and maybe something with carburetion and exhaust and went racing. Worked pretty well and now the horsepower numbers were over 800.

But today the bar has been raised again. Some people have realized that an engine built purposely for road racing will out perform a converted stock car engine. This despite the fact that the horsepower numbers are the same.

And what are those numbers today? One racer who reportedly has about 830 HP told me recently ” I can’t pass them (the top cars) on the straight, but they can pass me.” His opinion is that he is 30 horsepower shy of the top cars.

So times have changed my friend, times have changed.


Time is important to racers, particularly track time.  Lets face it most of us don’t get but so many chances to actually get on the track. Maybe a Friday test day, if the work schedule, and budget, allows.

And because we don’t have much time we go out and run laps, and think that maybe a new set of tires, or a different transmission or engine package is what we need.  But maybe that’s not the answer, maybe we could improve the car closer to its potential without spending a load of money. (Before anyone says anything I do exclude new tires from this, that is an area that there is no getting around) So how do you make the car better, given the limited amount of time?

Get organized. First, record what is on the car now. Make detailed notes of every part of the setup, sway bars, springs, tire pressure etc. Then record the results, and here you have to be honest with yourself. What did it do?

Then every time you go out on track, change something on the car,. What it is you and your crew can figure out. But try something different and again record the results. And record the data when it is relevant, as soon as the car comes off the track. You don’t know what it is  that may wake your car up.

But one thing is for sure if you don’t try you wont get any better.



For the past several years we have had the pleasure to be involved in the Trans-Am Series.

Baucom Motorsports Trans-Am Mustang

Baucom Motorsports Trans-Am Mustang sponsored by Roadraceparts.com

We are proud to announce that we are once again partnering with Baucom Motorsports as they contest the 2013 Trans-Am Series crown. John Baucom who drives the car is a veteran competitor in the series and we look forward to helping him achieve mutual success in the coming year.

As both the team owner as well as the driver John knows the value of reliability and service. And in his words : “As a professional racer I push my car to the limit.  RoadRaceparts.com provides the parts and knowledgeable service to keep my car and team in top condition.”

The series opener will be March 3 in Sebring Florida. The 11 race series will compete at some of the classic road racing courses in both the US and Canada.

Please visit us on the web at http://www.roadraceparts.com or contact us by phone at (804) 921-0902.

Under construction. The lower portion of the chassis taking shape.

Under construction. The lower portion of the chassis taking shape.

Can you guess what type chassis this is under construction? Brand? Well the type is pretty obvious. Its a GT1/Trans-Am/IMSA style road racing chassis.

Brand may be a little more difficult, because it is only the second one built.

Everyone that is involved in racing does so because they have a passion for it.  And part of that passion is a dream. A dream to succeed at the highest level. And of course  we all love to tackle those projects that are a challenge.

Thats how it is for Mark K. one of the principals in Roadraceparts.com. A veteran vintage racer he had dreamed of driving a Trans-Am car. Not just drive it but own it as well. So when the opportunity came about to purchase the engineering drawing for a professionally designed chassis and spares he jumped at it. Of course, knowing that one car had been built and successfully raced made it a little easier.

a start

A start. one of the sections that will become part of the lower chassis.

So in this brief article you can see several photos of the chassis on the surface plate. Work continues and all indications are that the results will be well worth the effort.

A professional at work.

A professional at work.

Bottom section of frame completed.

Bottom section of frame completed.

So that’s our little sneak preview. Hope you enjoyed it.

Chicago Rawhide spindle seals.

Chicago Rawhide spindle seals.
CR26144 – their price $22.49 – ours $17.99
CR27271 our price $14.49

So give us a call at (804) 921-0902 or email at sales@roadraceparts.com

It’s no secret to anyone not wearing rose-colored glasses that Motorsports is approaching a crisis. This is not confined to the U.S. but is a global issue. Whether you are talking about F1 or road racing in the U.S. unsettling things are happening. Things that do not bode well for those concerned.

In F1, generally considered to be the pinnacle of racing, the HRT team barely made it to the end of the 2012 season. They are not listed on the FIA’s list of teams to contest the 2013 championship. While many of the world’s major companies are involved, I doubt if other than Ferrari, McLaren, and Red Bull any of the teams are awash in cash. (Forgot Mercedes, but it may be approaching put up or shut up time for them.

Nascar had declines in both attendance and viewers from 2010. I don’t mention 2011 because that was a slight increase over 2010. In other words the decline has resumed.

Road racing in the U.S. is a total basket case. Grand Am has been on life support for its top class, Daytona prototype for some time. ALMS, while enjoying a wide range of manufacturer, primarily import, support had been for sale for a few years now. Now it has agreed to be purchased by Grand Am. (Remember Grand Am is owned by the France family, i.e. Nascar)

Trans-Am is gamely trying to recapture  the glory from the days of manufacturer involvement with the pony cars in the 60’s and 70’s. While the introduction of what are in essence stock car chassied pony cars bodes well, the lack of a viable TV contract is a MAJOR constraint.

Even vintage racing has taken a hit. Car counts are down at many venues, despite the fact that this is one of the most affordable ways to participate, maybe not race, that there is.

So what is to happen? Will all the brave talk of the “new car” in Nascar bring fans back? Will Twitter return Nascar back to its glory days of only a few years ago? Or, will a Generation 6 spec race car provide the same type of racing that has caused fans to abandon the sport in droves? And is Twitter another way to keep up with the sport without actually attending races?

As to GrandAm/ALMS what are they going to do? Will they try to make it a road racing version on Nascar? Or capitalize on the strengths of the two series?

Trans- AM is returning to the classic road racing circuits in the coming year. The addition of Sebring and Daytona, plus a return to VIR can only be viewed as positives. But even more so is the alignment with SVRA. That is probably the most natural fit for them. But still the major players aren’t coming in without a TV contract. Hopefully that will be addressed, because it is great racing.

Hopefully 2013 will be a year for growth in motorsport. But there is something going on in the world regarding Motorsports beyond the economy, and the powers that be need to address it. Iphones sell millions on the day they are introduced, but Nascar was down 24% in the 18-34 demo. Hmm? That should be speaking to somebody.

Now lets see, I have a car, all it needs is a few upgrades, and  if I could find a driver with some money………..

We all know that racing costs a lot of money. And to an outsider it sometimes seems that the large professional teams are almost swimming in it. f course that brings the inevitable chorus of “I hate them, they only win because they have the best drivers, the best equipment, blah, blah, blah”.

That complaint ranges from the club racer in SCCA road racing, or your Saturday night short track right up the ranks. Well, today there was an interesting article on the PlanetF1.com website which I have shamelessly copied. Here are the thoughts of the chief executive of the Sauber F1 team. An interesting comment of a form of racing that we think is immune to financial woes. Check it out:

Sauber throw weight behind budget cap

Tuesday 3rd April 2012

Sauber throw weight behind budget capSauber throw weight behind budget cap

Sauber chief executive Monisha Kaltenborn has backed Bernie Ecclestone’s calls for a budget cap in F1, saying it would make the sport “more interesting”.

Formula One commercial rights holder Ecclestone recently re-opened the debate about a budget cap as he felt there are still too many people “running around with rose-tinted glasses” when it comes to the spiralling costs.

“The teams have to learn to be competitive without tonnes of money,” he said.

“They have to refocus again on the basics – on racing, spending on the sport – and not on baronial motorhomes and all kinds of entertainment.”

Kaltenborn says the Hinwil-based Sauber is in favour of limiting the spending by teams.

“We started it with the Resource Restriction Agreement (RRA), and that in itself was already an important step, but of course it is far from the only one you need,” she told the official Formula One website.

“We now have to evolve it to the next step, and in my view the future should indeed lie in some kind of budget cap under which each and every team could do what they want to, because we all have different strengths. Looking at our team, for example, we have a good infrastructure and a good wind tunnel, so it would allow us to benefit from that.

“Others have other assets. Overall I think it would make Formula One more interesting as it would also mean that we would all use different strategies and take different approaches to the business and the sport.”

Ecclestone suggested cap could come into force from 2013, and Kaltenborn also feels it should be introduced “very soon”.

“I think we should have the next step already in place for next season and take it from there,” she said.

“Next season for me should already see a major step forward in the financial feasibility of a team.

“When the current Concorde Agreement comes to an end at the end of this season, I think it would be a good time to set some kind of rules.”

When the budget cap idea was first mooted by former FIA president Max Mosley a few years ago, some of the big teams refused to back it with Ferrari even threatening to pull out of the sport.

Kaltenborn, though, believes all teams know that something has got to give.

“By now even the big teams should appreciate that Formula One with four teams would not be overwhelmingly attractive to fans,” she said.

“That would be a very wrong message.

Perhaps there are other forms of racing (Nascar?) that would do well to heed her comments. Preparing a Plan B before you need it isn’t a bad idea.

Much has been made in the Nascar world recently about the fact that the Hendricks Motorsport car driven by Jimmy Johnson failed inspection at Daytona. As a result, Nascar reacted in their typical manner, fines and suspensions for the crew and car chief, as well as a deduction in points for the driver and car owner.

Of course there was the predictable reaction from the Nascar fans. Those who dislike/resent the success of/hate HMS and its efforts were not satisfied. The usual wailing and knashing of teeth followed about Nascar being in lockstep with its most successful team. On the other side of the coin there was the equally predictable response that “cheatin'” was a part of racing, it was basically boys being boys and it was much ado about nothing.

So which camp do you fall in? The “if you ain’t cheating you ain’t trying” group? or the one that prefers the enforce the rules to the letter group?

As for myself I have a foot firmly planted in both camps. I understand the desire and maybe need to be successful which will drive people to bend the rules. On the other hand, I favor zero tolerances. If a C Pillar or fender is supposed to have this configuration – no deviation. Measure it before the race, if it fails it fails, passes it passes. There is no need then to do anything postrace. But thats only my opinion.

While at it I have a question for you. We all know that the Nascar Sprint Cup car  is a spec car, right? So why not contract out to some metal stamping company, and there are thousands out there, the job of stamping out the body parts? Everybody gets the same parts, they add their manufacturers nose fascia and rear bumper cover. That way they put an end to all this nonsense. Zero tolerance before the race, if it isnt like you got it you’re out.

That of course assumes they really want to stop it. Which I doubt.